• Healthy to a T Newsletter

About Us

  • Nutrition Services at Jackson Public Schools is based at the Operations Center across from Hunt Elementary at 1401 N. Brown St.  We are committed to educate and model to others proper nutrition, which helps students succeed physically and academically.  You can contact us at (517) 841-2690.

    The Food Service Department provides breakfast and lunch daily at all of Jackson Public School’s facilities. Snacks are served at after-school educational programs.  A dinner program is available at many schools for students who are enrolled in after-school programs. 

    Catering services are available both on and off-site for school and community events.  Please call (517) 841-2174 for more information or to place an order.  You may also email Stephen Trout or call his cell phone at (517) 395-0391.

    The Food Service Team appreciates your input and may be contacted via phone or email - please check the Food Services - Staff page for details.



Fun Facts

  • Nutrition News!

     
     
        FUN FACTS:
     
     Nectarine Nectarine - This sweet, juicy treat is a relative of the peach.  They differ by a single gene for skin texture.  Peaches are fuzzy and dull, while nectarines are shiny and smooth.  California grows 95% of the nectarines produced in the United States.  Nectarines will continue to ripen off the tree.  No need to fuss and peel a nectarine ~ you can eat it with the skin on!
     
     
    Jalapeno   Jalapeno Pepper - are Mexican chili peppers that are picked while they are green.  When fully ripe, they are bright red, and when dried, they turn purple.  Jalapenos can be medium hot or very hot.  The "heat" is concentrated in the seeds and the veins on the inside of the pepper, so you can reduce the heat by removing the seeds and veins.  Eat a pepper that too spicy for you?  To help quench the pain, drink milk, not water.
     
     
      Coriander Coriander/Cilantro - The leaves plant are the herb "cilantro."  The seeds of the plant are the spice "coriander."  Fresh cilantro leaves have a short shelf life after being cut from the plant.  Their aroma is completely lost when dried or frozen.  Cilantro is heavily used in Mexican, Indian, Middle Eastern, and Asian cuisines.  Cilantro and coriander are very different in flavor; they cannot be used as a substitute for each other.
     
     
    Check for more information on these fruits and vegetables in the school cafeteria.


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Announcements

  • JPS Food Services is excited to announce it has its own app! Download the Taher Food4Life app and gain access to current menus, nutrition facts, allergy information and more!

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